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Archive for the ‘Turkey’ Category

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alachance/3231163757/in/set-72157612241800357/© 2008, Andy Lachance, all rights reserved

Infinite riches in a little room. Would you like to see more?

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BlueMosque

© Andy Lachance, all rights reserved

If you think this is good, you should really see it in four dimensions.

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la-fenice1We stride on two levels, I think. There’s the domestic life, the day-to-day, the gainings of friendships and expertise. And then there’s the moment of deep insight, a flash of a hidden facet – the pattern of a façade, a new interpretation of a famous piece of music, that makes you believe you’ve comprehended the shape of things.

On Valentine’s Day, my fiancée and I attended the first opera I’d seen in many years – Mozart’s The Magic Flute, performed by the Yale Opera. It was truly a production for our age, a thing of very high quality indeed. It managed to translate Mozart’s Enlightenment philosophies perfectly into the contemporary idiom, while flashing additional little insights from the right now. The costuming of this Singspiel spoke volumes: Pamino in burgundy, Tamina in a blue-white gown reminiscent of Snow White; male choristers in turbans, female choristers in Women’s Temperance League hats, the Three Spirits as American Revolutionaries, and Papageno and Papagena – the true scene-and-show-stealers in both panache and vocal qualitybirds of a feather in 19th-century French Bohemian linens.

When you put it that way, and remember that Die Zauberflöte premiered on September 30, 1791, it’s pretty easy to gather what Mozart might have been thinking about: music as the magical, reconciling element, enlightening society and freeing it from slavery. (An excellent added touch: as Tamino and Pamina ascend to the wedding altar, the three Revolutionary Sprites are ring-bearers, and don the coats of Colonial statesmen as they bring forth the wedding rings.) (more…)

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Sasha Cooke, mezzo-soprano, who will be joining us on Travel Dynamics International’s opera cruise of the Mediterranean September 29-October 9, 2009, had the role of Kitty Oppenheimer in the Met’s recent production of John Williams’ Dr. Atomic. Her performance won high praise from the New Yorker:

She was able to create a fresh, vital portrayal, bringing a luminous tone, a generously supported musical line, a keen sense of verbal nuance, and a flair for seduction.

You can see her below, in the Metropolitan Opera’s promo for Dr. Atomic (Sasha Cooke comes on at 1:13) —

Sasha has upcoming recitals at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, and the Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts in California; in 2008 she sang the role of Olga in Tchaikovsky’s Evgeny Onegin with the Israeli Opera in Tel Aviv; and in 2009 she will appear in orchestral concerts with the Chicago Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, and the Denver Symphony.

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Since embedding has been disabled on this clip, I wholeheartedly encourage you to click this link.

The legendary Marilyn Horne will be on our cruise in the Mediterranean September 29-October 9, 2009. She will be accompanied by six of the greatest rising talents in classical performance today – four singers and two pianists – including members of the Metropolitan Opera of New York City. They’ll be performing  just for you during the length of the cruise. Please take a look at the itinerary and see if you’d like to be part of this incredible experience.

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Here’s a brief sampling (5 mins) of the type of experience Travel Dynamics International creates. In 2006, we sailed to the Mediterranean with actor Yannis Simonides, who adapted an award-winning dramatic monologue from The Apology of Socrates by Plato. We decided to stage this performance at the steps of the famed 2rd-century AD Library of Celsus in the center of ancient Ephesus. Enjoy!

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And it looked so innocent.

And it looked so innocent.

(ANSAmed) – BERLIN, AUGUST 21 – Troy was much bigger than what was believed until now, Ernst Pernicka, professor of Archeometry at the University of Tuebingen and in charge of the excavations under way in Turkey, affirms. While the scholars believed for long time that the legendary city spans on a surface of at most 27 hectares, in fact Troy was located on a surface of 35 hectares, Pernicka told the German media. The continuation of a defensive trench from the Bronze Age was recently discovered by the archaeologists and it allowed evaluating unequivocally the real expansion of Troy. (ANSAmed).

See the newly uncovered trench and affirm all your Brad Pitt-related fantasies on the Journey of Odysseus next autumn.

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